Menedżerowie Archive

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Biznes wymaga czasu i cierpliwości

Londyn fot. Grzybowski SAM_7436 Janusz Wysocki Londyn fot. Grzybowski

Rozmowa z: Janusz Wysocki, prezes i właściciel MIXER GROUP.

Internet Manager: Transport, usługi medyczne, szkoła i uczelnia, organizacja imprez, biuro księgowe, ezakupy, pomoc w załatwianiu rezydentur i obywatelstwa,  obrót nieruchomościami, wreszcie własne wydawnictwo i radio. Jak dochodzi się do tak  zróżnicowanej działalności?

Janusz Wysocki – Cierpliwością. Zaczynając kilkanaście lat temu działalność biznesową w Londynie skupiłem się na usługach transportowych, bo ten rynek znałem najlepiej. Zaprocentował o doświadczenie z Polski i angielskiej firmy transportowej, w której pracowałem po przyjeździe do Anglii. Ilość Polaków na Wyspach rosła systematycznie i wzrastał popyt na transport ludzi. Firma szybko się rozwijała.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Mastering Complexity Through Simplification: Four Steps to Creating Competitive Advantage

BCG 2017-02 Mastering-Complexity 4 steps Ex 1

Businesses compete in a world that is growing ever more complex. Disruptive technologies emerge with increasing frequency. Customers’ needs and demands change at breakneck speed. New competitors are always entering the fray. Read the rest of this entry »

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How growth champions thrive even in stagnating markets

McK 2017-08 GrowthMindset-Exhibits_1-png

A deeply ingrained growth mind-set gives these organisations the ultimate edge.

Today, it’s no surprise that corporations’ focus on growth has risen to cult-like popularity.

In one of the most laborious analyses McKinsey has ever conducted, a team spent more than a year studying hundreds of large companies. Researchers mapped out how the companies grew over a decade, comparing portfolio momentum against market-share improvement by analysing market growth within each granular business segment, accounting for M&A along the way.

The team’s most powerful finding? On average, the company that grew about 8.7 percent a year gained 5.4 percent of this from portfolio momentum, about 2.5 percent from M&A and only 0.8 percent from market-share gain.

Only 13 percent of companies averaged more than five percent of annual growth directly from market share gain over a ten year period.  Some of the most successful market share gain actions, from new product launches or pricing moves tend to trigger competitors’ reactions that often slow or even reverse these gains.

Based on what 90 percent of companies do to cultivate growth, we strongly emphasize dynamic resource re-allocation as well as M&A to take bigger advantage of portfolio momentum. But we also emphasize that the strongest growth business have generated greater returns to shareholders when their growth was mostly organic as the ultimate objective is value creating growth.

All this is easier said than done! What does it take to grow and successfully add value?

As strategists, we first look for strong competitive advantages, innovative business models and an outward focus on areas such as customer obsession and important external trends. However, executives who have enjoyed strong phases of growth tell us about a zealous growth mind-set that gave them a crucial edge. They refer to a deeply ingrained belief and attitude that was shared across the company, that the business model is well-positioned, and they have the capabilities and resources to deliver above-industry growth.

So, what does it take for organizations to cultivate such a growth mind-set that will authentically permeate throughout the organisation? With this question in mind, we have identified five traits that successful growth companies exhibit.

Yuval Atsmon is a senior partner in McKinsey’s London office. Norbert Lurz is a Senior Advisor in McKinsey & Company’s Consumer Packaged Goods Practice and a former Senior Executive of Procter & Gamble, Gillette and Reckitt Benckiser.

More: www.mckinsey.com

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The next-generation operating model for the digital world

McK 2017-03 The next-generation model 1

Companies need to increase revenues, lower costs, and delight customers. Doing that requires reinventing the operating model.

Companies know where they want to go. They want to be more agile, quicker to react, and more effective. They want to deliver great customer experiences, take advantage of new technologies to cut costs, improve quality and transparency, and build value. The problem is that while most companies are trying to get better, the results tend to fall short: one-off initiatives in separate units that don’t have a big enterprise-wide impact; adoption of the improvement method of the day, which almost invariably yields disappointing results; and programs that provide temporary gains but aren’t sustainable.

We have found that for companies to build value and provide compelling customer experiences at lower cost, they need to commit to a next-generation operating model. This operating model is a new way of running the organization that combines digital technologies and operations capabilities in an integrated, well-sequenced way to achieve step-change improvements in revenue, customer experience, and cost.

A simple way to visualize this operating model is to think of it as having two parts, each requiring companies to adopt major changes in the way they work:

  • The first part involves a shift from running uncoordinated efforts within siloes to launching an integrated operational-improvement program organized around customer journeys (the set of interactions a customer has with a company when making a purchase or receiving services) as well as the internal journeys (end-to-end processes inside the company). Examples of customer journeys include a homeowner filing an insurance claim, a cable-TV subscriber signing up for a premium channel, or a shopper looking to buy a gift online. Examples of internal-process journeys include Order-to-Cash or Record-to-Report.
  • The second part is a shift from using individual technologies, operations capabilities, and approaches in a piecemeal manner inside siloes to applying them to journeys in combination and in the right sequence to achieve compound impact.

More: www.mckinsey.com/business

Authors: Albert Bollard is an associate partner in McKinsey’s New York office; Elixabete Larrea is an associate partner in the Boston office; Alex Singla is a senior partner in the Chicago office, and Rohit Sood is a partner in the Toronto office.

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Ambicje nie wystarczą, by przebić szklany sufit

Deloitte 2017-02-25 Ambicje nie wystarczą 1 - Lana Popović Coca Cola Polska

„Sukces TO JA” wpisuje się w globalną strategię firmy Coca-Cola „5by20”, zakładającą aktywizację zawodową 5 mln
kobiet na całym świecie do roku 2020. Przede wszystkim pozostaje on jednak inicjatywą odpowiadającą na potrzeby
polskiego społeczeństwa. Jest wyrazem naszego długofalowego zaangażowania i zobowiązania do współdziałania
na rzecz dalszego, zrównoważonego rozwoju Polski, podjętym w 25. rocznicę działalności firm systemu Coca-Cola w Polsce.
Lana Popović, Dyrektor Generalna, Coca-Cola Poland Services
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