Zarządzanie Firmą Archive

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Biznes wymaga czasu i cierpliwości

Londyn fot. Grzybowski SAM_7436 Janusz Wysocki Londyn fot. Grzybowski

Rozmowa z: Janusz Wysocki, prezes i właściciel MIXER GROUP.

Internet Manager: Transport, usługi medyczne, szkoła i uczelnia, organizacja imprez, biuro księgowe, ezakupy, pomoc w załatwianiu rezydentur i obywatelstwa,  obrót nieruchomościami, wreszcie własne wydawnictwo i radio. Jak dochodzi się do tak  zróżnicowanej działalności?

Janusz Wysocki – Cierpliwością. Zaczynając kilkanaście lat temu działalność biznesową w Londynie skupiłem się na usługach transportowych, bo ten rynek znałem najlepiej. Zaprocentował o doświadczenie z Polski i angielskiej firmy transportowej, w której pracowałem po przyjeździe do Anglii. Ilość Polaków na Wyspach rosła systematycznie i wzrastał popyt na transport ludzi. Firma szybko się rozwijała.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Mastering Complexity Through Simplification: Four Steps to Creating Competitive Advantage

BCG 2017-02 Mastering-Complexity 4 steps Ex 1

Businesses compete in a world that is growing ever more complex. Disruptive technologies emerge with increasing frequency. Customers’ needs and demands change at breakneck speed. New competitors are always entering the fray. Read the rest of this entry »

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How growth champions thrive even in stagnating markets

McK 2017-08 GrowthMindset-Exhibits_1-png

A deeply ingrained growth mind-set gives these organisations the ultimate edge.

Today, it’s no surprise that corporations’ focus on growth has risen to cult-like popularity.

In one of the most laborious analyses McKinsey has ever conducted, a team spent more than a year studying hundreds of large companies. Researchers mapped out how the companies grew over a decade, comparing portfolio momentum against market-share improvement by analysing market growth within each granular business segment, accounting for M&A along the way.

The team’s most powerful finding? On average, the company that grew about 8.7 percent a year gained 5.4 percent of this from portfolio momentum, about 2.5 percent from M&A and only 0.8 percent from market-share gain.

Only 13 percent of companies averaged more than five percent of annual growth directly from market share gain over a ten year period.  Some of the most successful market share gain actions, from new product launches or pricing moves tend to trigger competitors’ reactions that often slow or even reverse these gains.

Based on what 90 percent of companies do to cultivate growth, we strongly emphasize dynamic resource re-allocation as well as M&A to take bigger advantage of portfolio momentum. But we also emphasize that the strongest growth business have generated greater returns to shareholders when their growth was mostly organic as the ultimate objective is value creating growth.

All this is easier said than done! What does it take to grow and successfully add value?

As strategists, we first look for strong competitive advantages, innovative business models and an outward focus on areas such as customer obsession and important external trends. However, executives who have enjoyed strong phases of growth tell us about a zealous growth mind-set that gave them a crucial edge. They refer to a deeply ingrained belief and attitude that was shared across the company, that the business model is well-positioned, and they have the capabilities and resources to deliver above-industry growth.

So, what does it take for organizations to cultivate such a growth mind-set that will authentically permeate throughout the organisation? With this question in mind, we have identified five traits that successful growth companies exhibit.

Yuval Atsmon is a senior partner in McKinsey’s London office. Norbert Lurz is a Senior Advisor in McKinsey & Company’s Consumer Packaged Goods Practice and a former Senior Executive of Procter & Gamble, Gillette and Reckitt Benckiser.

More: www.mckinsey.com

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The next-generation operating model for the digital world

McK 2017-03 The next-generation model 1

Companies need to increase revenues, lower costs, and delight customers. Doing that requires reinventing the operating model.

Companies know where they want to go. They want to be more agile, quicker to react, and more effective. They want to deliver great customer experiences, take advantage of new technologies to cut costs, improve quality and transparency, and build value. The problem is that while most companies are trying to get better, the results tend to fall short: one-off initiatives in separate units that don’t have a big enterprise-wide impact; adoption of the improvement method of the day, which almost invariably yields disappointing results; and programs that provide temporary gains but aren’t sustainable.

We have found that for companies to build value and provide compelling customer experiences at lower cost, they need to commit to a next-generation operating model. This operating model is a new way of running the organization that combines digital technologies and operations capabilities in an integrated, well-sequenced way to achieve step-change improvements in revenue, customer experience, and cost.

A simple way to visualize this operating model is to think of it as having two parts, each requiring companies to adopt major changes in the way they work:

  • The first part involves a shift from running uncoordinated efforts within siloes to launching an integrated operational-improvement program organized around customer journeys (the set of interactions a customer has with a company when making a purchase or receiving services) as well as the internal journeys (end-to-end processes inside the company). Examples of customer journeys include a homeowner filing an insurance claim, a cable-TV subscriber signing up for a premium channel, or a shopper looking to buy a gift online. Examples of internal-process journeys include Order-to-Cash or Record-to-Report.
  • The second part is a shift from using individual technologies, operations capabilities, and approaches in a piecemeal manner inside siloes to applying them to journeys in combination and in the right sequence to achieve compound impact.

More: www.mckinsey.com/business

Authors: Albert Bollard is an associate partner in McKinsey’s New York office; Elixabete Larrea is an associate partner in the Boston office; Alex Singla is a senior partner in the Chicago office, and Rohit Sood is a partner in the Toronto office.

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Twelve Forces That Will Radically Change How Organizations Work

bcg 2017_March_27 Twelve Forces 1

A tidal wave of change is coming that will soon make the way we work almost unrecognizable to today’s business leaders. In an age of rapidly evolving technologies, business models, demographics, and even workplace attitudes—all shifting concurrently—change is not only constant but also exponential in its pace and scope. Companies from startups and online businesses to incumbents in all industries will experience the effects in far-reaching and transformational ways.

During a comprehensive, yearlong analysis of the global work landscape, The Boston Consulting Group identified 60 major trends propelling this tidal wave, which we’ve grouped into 12 primary forces. These forces, or megatrends, fall into four categories. The first two address changes in the demand for talent: technological and digital productivity and shifts in ways of generating business value. The second two address changes in the supply of talent: shifts in resource distribution and changing workforce cultures and values.

Together, these forces will revolutionize the way that work gets done in companies and will compel leaders to rethink even the most basic assumptions about how their organizations function. They will need to discover new ways of organizing, performing, and leading, along with new approaches to recruiting, developing, and engaging employees. All this in organizations with limitless data, open boundaries, employees and machines working side by side, and rapidly evolving employee value propositions.

BCG has assessed the impact of these megatrends on organizations. In this report, the first in the New New Way of Working series, we identify several companies that are leading the way. Yet most organizations still have far to go.

The New Age of Work

What changes will these trends bring? As companies respond to the 12 forces, we expect several key developments in the next few years.

  • Companies will develop a more fluid sense of what is inside and what is outside their boundaries. They will move beyond rigid distinctions between employees, outside suppliers, and customers, developing platforms to promote collaboration among all stakeholders. Eventually, as value chains break up into networks and platforms, the role of the organization will shift from that of a controller of resources to that of a facilitator of ecosystems and a conduit for realizing individual aspirations.
  • Speed and agility will be essential to competitiveness. Many companies will look to break up entrenched departments and reporting lines, opting to organize work in smaller and more agile interdisciplinary teams. These teams will learn to work in short “sprint” cycles to produce minimal viable products and services, solicit feedback on them, and refine them through rapid iterations. Individuals will rotate among projects, training, internal incubators, and even social impact initiatives. These agile and innovative approaches, along with design thinking and other related methodologies, will soon become the norm, not just in IT (where they originated) but across functions and practices.
  • Companies will continually develop (and redevelop) their people, so that they are equipped to deal with the tidal wave of change. They will also inculcate diversity, inclusion, and flexibility in their corporate DNA. They will shift from HR processes, policies, and systems to problem-solving interactions. And as flexible, cloud-based software replaces traditional documentation and controls, HR will customize its interfaces with employees to better support individual needs and desires.
  • The increased prevalence of digital technology and artificial intelligence will lead to new job functions and categories—but also to shortages of people with the skills needed to fill those roles. Many companies will need to focus more on developing digital skills among their current workers or identifying and recruiting potential new hires. In addition, companies will need digital bridge builders: intermediaries between employees with specialized digital talent and those in nontech roles.

Smart leaders will monitor these changes and experiment with new ways of working that align with their company’s context and capabilities. In addition, they will define their businesses not in terms of their competitive advantages but in terms of the purpose that makes them relevant in a rapidly evolving world.

 

These 12 trends are complex and interrelated. To cope with them, companies need a well-thought-out strategy that can translate into concrete interventions. Those that do not develop such a strategy may soon find themselves bumping up against nimbler rivals, unable to adapt to the disruption in time.

In future publications in the New New Way of Working series, we will discuss the implications of these trends in more detail as we explore the following topics:

  • Organizational structures that support more agile and nimble ways of working and allow for open boundaries
  • New ways of developing talent, including leadership talent, that incorporate technology and analytics
  • New models for managing change in an environment of always-on transformation
  • The value and importance of a corporate purpose, not just as a fad but as a differentiator and a source of competitive advantage

Appendix

Our yearlong analysis revealed 60 trends, which we consolidated into 12 megatrends in four areas.

Technological and Digital Productivity

Automation: Industry 4.0; artificial intelligence, machine learning, and wearables; digital channels; augmented reality; and robotics

Big Data and Advanced Analytics: Predictive technology, integrated tools to optmize performance, social media insights, behavioral sensors, and big data

Access to Information and Ideas: Cloud-based technology and the “Internet of everything,” open-source software and processes, open innovation and peer-to-peer technology, decreasing degrees of separation, and new capital and infrastructure platforms

Shifts in Ways of Generating Business Value

Simplicity in Complexity: The value of simplicity, lean methodologies, the evolution from silos to more holistic organizations, specialization, and organizational complicatedness

Agility and Innovation: An accelerating pace of change, increasing uncertainty and black-swan events, exponential organizations, agile development, and digital stakes and subsidiaries

New Customer Strategies: Personalization and premium products and services, the sharing economy, data security, ethics, and the environment

Shifts in Resource Distribution

A New Demographic Mix: The “demographic dividend,” talent scarcity, aging populations, multiple generations in the workforce, and talent imbalances

Skill Imbalances: New skills, waning skill life, formal curricula and development, digital late-comers, and skills education and reach

Shifting Geopolitical and Economic Power: Disparity in wages and economic growth rates, multiple centers of power, urbanization and resource depletion, migration, and the rise of the middle class in developing countries

Changing Workforce Cultures and Values

Diversity and Inclusion: Multiculturalism, racial and ethnic diversity, gender equality, value pluralism, and equitable economic development

Individualism and Entrepreneurship: Freelance work versus employee loyalty, risk taking and entrepreneurism, multidisciplinary pursuits, talent renting and freelancing, and individualized aspirations

Well-Being and Purpose: Desire for personal, social, and communal impact; reflection and purpose; self-expression; appreciation and respect; and physical and mental health and balance

Authors:

Vikram Bhalla
Senior Partner & Managing Director
Mumbai
Susanne Dyrchs
Project Leader
Cologne
Rainer Strack
Senior Partner & Managing Director
Düsseldorf
More about 12 trends in The BCG New New Way of Working Series