Inkubator Menedżerów Archive

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EY: Business 5.0 – seria spotkań z ekspertami EY SAP

W obszarze technologii jak i biznesu, najważniejszy pozostaje człowiek oraz jego decyzje. Zmiana nie zawsze oznacza rozwój, a cyfrowa transformacja nie zawsze kończy się sukcesem. Czy wiesz, jak się przygotować i jakie decyzje podjąć, by skutecznie ją wdrożyć?
Zapraszamy na serię spotkań z ekspertami EY SAP i ich gośćmi, którzy przedyskutują dostępne rozwiązania oraz perspektywy, by umożliwić Państwu podjęcie świadomych decyzji biznesowych.

SAP Dilemmas
Wyzwania, złożone wybory cyfrowej transformacji oraz moc możliwości: „SAP Dilemmas” to nowy cykl spotkań z ekspertami, który rozpocznie się już 29 kwietnia.

Zapraszamy do udziału:

  • 29 kwietnia | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Bezpiecznie, szybko i niedrogo – czy to fikcja w rozmowach o chmurze? – Zapisz się

Podczas pierwszego webcastu w ramach serii „SAP Dilemmas” eksperci EY porozmawiają o znanych i mniej popularnych kwestiach dotyczących rozwiązań SAP w chmurze publicznej.

  • 13 maja | 13:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Ile razy jesteś gotów się pomylić, aby móc to zrobić dobrze? – Zapisz się
  • 8 czerwca | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Jaki wybrać model transformacji w HR? – Zapisz się
  • 7 września | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Jak cyfrowa transformacja może być bardziej realna? – Zapisz się
  • 28 września | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Jak zdefiniować zakres wdrożenia i oszacować koszty cyfrowej transformacji? – Zapisz się
  • 21 października | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Jaki zespół najlepiej będzie wspierał Twoje systemy? – Zapisz się
  • 18 listopada | 11:00 | SAP Dilemmas: Czy planując analitykę, analizujesz wszystkie możliwości? – Zapisz się

Więcej: https://info.ey.com/

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McK: The CEO moment Leadership for a new era

COVID-19 has created a massive humanitarian challenge: millions ill and hundreds of thousands of lives lost; soaring unemployment rates in the world’s most robust economies; food banks stretched beyond capacity; governments straining to deliver critical services. The pandemic is also a challenge for businesses—and their CEOs—unlike any they have ever faced, forcing an abrupt dislocation of how employees work, how customers behave, how supply chains function, and even what ultimately constitutes business performance.

Confronting this unique moment, CEOs have shifted how they lead in expedient and ingenious ways. The changes may have been birthed of necessity, but they have great potential beyond this crisis. In this article, we explore four shifts in how CEOs are leading that are also better ways to lead a company: unlocking bolder (“10x”) aspirations, elevating their “to be” list to the same level as “to do” in their operating models, fully embracing stakeholder capitalism, and harnessing the full power of their CEO peer networks. If they become permanent, these shifts hold the potential to thoroughly recalibrate the organization and how it operates, the company’s performance potential, and its relationship to critical constituents.

Only CEOs can decide whether to continue leading in these new ways, and in so doing seize a once-in-a-generation opportunity to consciously evolve the very nature and impact of their role. Indeed, as we have written elsewhere, part of the role of the CEO is to serve as a chief calibrator—deciding the extent and degree of change needed. As part of this, CEOs must have a thesis of transformation that works in their company context. A good CEO is always scanning for signals and helping the organization deliver fine-tuned responses. A great CEO will see that this moment is a unique opportunity for self-calibration, with profound implications for the organization.

We have spoken with and counseled hundreds of CEOs since the pandemic first hit. It is clear to us that they sense an opportunity to lead in a new, more positive and impactful way. If a critical mass of CEOs embraces and extends what they have learned during the pandemic, this CEO moment could become a CEO movement—one that is profoundly positive for the achievement of corporate, human, and societal potential. As Rajnish Kumar, chairman of the State Bank of India, reflects, “This will be a true inflection point. I think that this pandemic, in terms of implications, will be as big an event as World War II. And whatever we learn through this process, it must not go to waste.”

(…)

Invest further in building relationships with other CEOs

CEOs are communicating more, and expanding their networks, in part because only another CEO confronting the pandemic can fully identify with today’s leadership challenges. As Laxman Narasimhan, CEO of Reckitt Benckiser, puts it: “I find talking to other CEOs about how they are handling the crisis extremely helpful—this shared experience connects us and gives me added perspectives.” Says AmerisourceBergen CEO Steve Collis, “From an external perspective, I’ve been a beneficiary of amazing calls with other CEOs who have been willing to share their knowledge. This has been such a growing experience.”

Hospital CEOs realized we were chasing each other around the supply chains [hunting for PPE]. So we began to coordinate. It became almost a daily call.

— Kate Walsh, CEO, Boston Medical Center

It’s no surprise that CEOs are seeing the benefits of connecting in new ways during this crisis. The urgency of the moment has given focus and urgency to the nature of the dialogue. Kate Walsh, CEO of Boston Medical Center, started talking to her peers early in the pandemic, when Boston was becoming one of the country’s COVID-19 hot spots. “Hospital CEOs realized we were chasing each other around the supply chains,” says Walsh. “We began to coordinate, so at least we could let people know that we’d give everybody a mask when they come to work on Monday morning. It became almost a daily call [with other hospitals] as we tried to figure out how to respond to the volume of cases.” Leaders are less focused on showing up to large group meetings and putting on a corporate face that suggests “We’ve got it under control.” Instead, they are intent on accelerating problem solving together by building on one another’s ideas, iterating novel solutions to use in the workplace, trading notes, and moving forward having learned what works best. They are also encouraging one another to conduct bold experiments, taking advantage of the current environment to do A/B testing on a massive scale and trying new ways of operating virtually and digitally.

In order for CEOs to leverage such interactions in the future and accelerate impact on shared challenges, they will have to continue to approach such opportunities—both formal and informal—with humility, a learning mindset, and an open-minded commitment to ongoing development. The benefits of doing so are more significant than one might imagine: role modeling this has the potential to create more open learning organizations for companies, and to identify the cross-industry analogies that often provide the touchstone for innovation. Without the pressure of a crisis, however, leadership resolve will be required to maintain such an approach—research makes it clear that none of this is easy for people in powerful roles.

In light of the newfound connectivity among CEOs within and across industries happening in this moment, CEOs will benefit from reflecting on the following questions:

  • What peer networks should I continue or create beyond the crisis (in particular, those in analogous but not identical situations)?
  • What makes for a valuable peer interaction, and how can I ensure that these conditions are in place when I interact with other CEOs?
  • Beyond role modeling, how can I encourage my senior team and other leaders to enrich their own networks and the velocity of learnings with their peers across industries?

Leverage networks to tackle a broad set of issues

CEO networks also have a unique potential to enable some of the other things we have talked about thus far in this article. CEOs in noncompetitive industries are well positioned to both challenge and support their peers in aiming higher; in sharing learnings, best practices, and encouragement regarding elevating “to be” to the same level as “to do”; and in working through how to fully embrace stakeholder capitalism.

COVID-19 has brought with it a pressurized operating environment the likes of which few of today’s CEOs have ever experienced—it has “unfrozen” many aspects of the CEO role.

The pharmaceutical industry’s “10x” rush to counter COVID-19 bears witness to this. As Christophe Weber, CEO of Takeda Pharmaceuticals, explains, “We started the development of a plasma-derived medicine for COVID-19 by ourselves. But our head of Plasma-Derived Therapies realized that if we formed an alliance with other plasma companies, we could go much faster and would have the potential to produce a product on a bigger scale. So now we have a pro bono, not-for-profit alliance. And we have a very good alliance with other major plasma companies, smaller ones, and also nonplasma companies, like Microsoft. When everybody saw that it was a true alliance to do good for society, we were able to get the convergence of many companies.”

This interest in shared success can create wins for multiple stakeholders. “Part [of the adjustment to COVID-19] is focusing even more on partnering with and supporting the community,” says CCHMC’s Fisher. “For example, CEOs of major employers, including P&G, Kroger, Fifth Third Bank, Cincinnati Children’s, and others, initiated a task force to focus on a robust and inclusive restart of our economy and region. Being part of those things is more important than ever to me, our institution, and our community.”

Alain Bejjani of MAF frames the potential for CEOs to work together in ways that change the world for the better. Says Bejjani, “Employers enjoy the highest level of trust compared to governments and even NGOs [nongovernmental organizations]. This capital of trust is very important and something CEOs should leverage going forward. We should be at the bridgehead for change. Governments cannot win, cannot deal with the complex issues of our time, without business. Business, in turn, cannot win without government and civil society.” As COVID-19 has made clear, changing the world for the better is good not only for society but also for business.

As CEOs look forward to decide what issues to tackle with their peers, they can build on their pandemic experience by considering the following questions:

  • On what issues has peer connectivity most benefited my business, now and in the future?
  • On what societal issues (such as inequity and racism, climate change, porous social safety nets, weakened healthcare systems) should peer connectivity be directed, and how can I maintain the same level of intensity that I did during the pandemic?
  • What issues will I take personal leadership on and convene others around?

COVID-19 has brought with it a pressurized operating environment the likes of which few of today’s CEOs have ever experienced. It has necessitated a reappraisal of how much is possible and in what time frames. It has forced personal disclosure at levels previously considered uncomfortable and, in doing so, has increased awareness of the importance of how leaders show up personally. It has shined a light on the interconnectivity of stakeholder concerns. It has prompted a level of substance-based, peer-to-peer CEO interaction that has elevated all involved. Ultimately, it has “unfrozen” many aspects of the CEO role, making possible a re-fusing of new and existing elements that could define the CEO role of the future.

When the pressure decreases, will CEOs go back to operating as they did before? Or will the role at the top be thoughtfully reconsidered and reconceived by those who occupy it? Clearly, not every CEO will choose to make permanent the four shifts we’ve discussed. The more that CEOs do, however, the more the moment has the potential to become a movement—one that could create higher-achieving, more purposeful, more humane, and better-connected leaders. Judging by the evolution underway, many companies and societies stand to benefit.

About the authors: Carolyn Dewar is a senior partner in McKinsey’s San Francisco office, Scott Keller is a senior partner in the Southern California office, Kevin Sneader is McKinsey’s global managing partner and is based in the Hong Kong office, and Kurt Strovink is a senior partner in the New York office.

The authors wish to thank Monica Murarka for her contributions to this article.

More: McKinsey.com

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McKinsey: Five priorities for CEOs in the next normal

McK What matters most Five priorities for CEOs in the next normal

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/what-matters-most-five-priorities-for-ceos-

What matters most? Five priorities for CEOs in the next normal

Download this collection of insights on the five priorities global executives have told us they’re focusing on as they navigate the trends shaping the future.

Full Report (116 pages)

Over the course of the pandemic, businesses have largely—and often successfully—adapted to new ways of working. They’ve also embraced digitization and reorganized their supply chains. All of this has been necessary, but it will not be enough. To prepare for the post-COVID-19 era, leaders need to do more than fine-tune their day-to-day tasks; they need to be ready and willing to rethink how they operate, and even why they exist. To put it another way, leaders need to step back, take a breath, and consider a broader perspective.

The pandemic has both revealed and accelerated a number of trends that will play a substantial role in the shape of the future global economy. In our conversations with global executives, they have identified five priorities. Companies will want to adopt these five priorities as their North Star while they navigate the trends that are molding the future. (Click on the tiles of the interactive below for more on each priority, including links to relevant articles.)

Take sustainability, the principle of producing goods and services while exacting minimal damage to the environment. Many companies have taken earnest steps in this regard because they wanted to. In the very near future, however, doing so will be as fundamental to doing business as compiling a balance sheet: consumers and regulators will insist on it. In this context, sustainability needs to be done as systematically as digitization or strategy development because it will be an important source of long-term competitive advantage.

Click each card to learn more: McKinsey.com/thenextnormal.

Center strategy on sustainability

Center strategy on sustainability. Business can act to ensure that sustainability is more than a buzzword. One possibility is to consider investing in technologies that suck carbon from the atmosphere. Make no mistake: given current and future commitments, climate is going to be an increasingly important way to create competitive advantage.

Organizing for sustainability success: Where, and how, leaders can startHow negative emissions can help organizations meet their climate goalsWhy investing in nature is key to climate mitigation

Transform in the cloud

Transform in the cloud. The cloud’s potential to create value has long been clear—but now its capabilities are becoming grounded in reality. By enabling both speed and scale, the cloud is critical to innovation. By 2030, there could be $1 trillion at stake—and it’s likely that early adopters will win the lion’s share.

Three actions CEOs can take to get value from cloud computingCloud’s trillion-dollar prize is up for grabs

Cultivate your talent

Cultivate your talent. Talent is the most important natural resource, and leading companies are showing how to develop it. They coach and empower small teams; deploy talent based on skills, not hierarchy; and fill gaps through training and development. The bottom line: a better employee experience delivers better results.

The new possible: How HR can help build the organization of the futureTackling Asia’s talent challenge: How to adapt to a digital futureThe new science of talent: From roles to returns

Press the need for speed

Press the need for speed. The pandemic forced many organizations to move fast. Now the priority is to sustain that speed by designing it into the organization. Think of speed as a muscle to be developed. Invest in new collaboration technologies. Anticipate shifts in demand. Focus on outcomes.

Speed and resilience: Five priorities for the next five monthsReturn as a muscle: How lessons from COVID-19 can shape a robust operating model for hybrid and beyondOrganizing for speed in advanced industries

Operate with purpose

Operate with purpose. Employees want to work at places that have a sense of purpose—and will leave if they don’t find it. Companies that execute with purpose are more likely to generate long-term value. And people expect business to do more than make money for shareholders—although that is essential.

The case for stakeholder capitalismHelp your employees find purpose—or watch them leaveMore than a mission statement: How the 5Ps embed purpose to deliver value

Or consider the cloud. Its potential has long been recognized; now it is beginning to bring real results in innovation and productivity. A second priority, then, is for companies to deploy the cloud for good purpose. To do so, their people need to be “cloud literate”—that is, to have a keen sense of the cloud’s capabilities.

As ever, it’s the human element that makes the difference. Developing talent is therefore another priority. The organization of the future will not—or, at least, should not—look like the one that existed as recently as 2019. It will need to be more flexible, less hierarchical, and more diverse.

And faster. The pace of change is speeding up, and the landscape of business is more fluid than ever. The need for speed—a fourth priority—is therefore acute. But this speed needs to be sustainable. Businesses did remarkable things in the early months of the pandemic, fueled by adrenaline and a sense of urgency. In the future, speed needs to be embedded into the organization. To put it another way, speed is not just about revving the engine faster, but designing it to run more efficiently and intelligently.

Finally, leaders need to recognize that people want meaning in their lives, and their work. Previous research has found that companies with a strong sense of purpose outperform those that lack one. And those who say they live their purpose at work are simply better employees—more loyal, more likely to go the extra mile, and less likely to leave. Purpose helps companies recognize emerging opportunities and connect with their customers. This, too, should therefore be seen as a priority and a source of competitive advantage.

How these five priorities are implemented will vary from company to company; some will be more important than others, depending on the market. But we believe—and executives around the world with whom we have worked agree—that mastering these five priorities will substantially improve the odds of success.

The articles listed in the interactive can be downloaded here. Our entire collection of individual insights related to the next normal is at McKinsey.com/thenextnormal.

About the authors

Homayoun Hatami; Global Leader, Capabilities Practices, Paris; LinkedIn; Email

Liz Hilton Segel; Global Leader, Industry Practices, New York; LinkedIn; Email

 

 

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How to become ‘tech forward’

A technology-transformation approach that works

Whether it’s been the shift to online working, the spike in online demand, or the increase in cyber assaults, technology has emerged as a critical business capability. That reality has injected a renewed importance and new urgency into modernizing the technology function. Companies can no longer afford the long timelines and often-disappointing business returns that have hampered many of the large tech-transformation projects of the past.

Instead, some technology leaders have pursued a new approach that is comprehensive enough to account for the myriad interlinkages of modern technology joined at the hip with the business so that change delivers value, and self-funded so that the scope of the change can continue to expand. We think of this comprehensive approach as “tech forward.”

Counteracting the most devastating tech-transformation failure modes

Some companies are starting to see real impact from their tech transformations. In a recent McKinsey study, some 50 percent of surveyed companies reported moderate to significant impact on realizing new revenue streams, almost 70 percent reported impact on increasing existing revenue streams, and 76 percent reported impact on reducing costs. 1

Tech transformations, nonetheless, remain notoriously difficult and complex. Though many companies are transforming their tech organizations, about 50 percent of them report that they’re still in the pilot phase (small tech teams working with advanced technologies but isolated from the rest of the technology function). 2

To understand better what successful tech transformations look like—as well as what the most important pitfalls are—we spoke with nearly 700 CIOs at some of the largest companies across the world. These conversations illuminated a number of consistent factors that most consistently kill off even the most promising tech transformations and revealed antidotes to address them. Following are three of the most common failure modes.

Piecemeal activity and limited scope

There is no shortage of technology-transformation initiatives, all of them with good intentions and promising payoffs. In fact, our latest analysis shows that companies are expanding the range of tech-related transformations (Exhibit 1).

What a ‘tech forward’ transformation looks like

Detailed conversations with CIOs as well as our own experience helping businesses execute complex technology transformations yielded a broad array of insights, best practices, and guidelines. We’ve synthesized them into a “tech forward” model that highlights three interconnected vectors, within which are ten specific “plays,” or domains of activity (Exhibit 2).

Vector #1: A reimagined role for technology that’s focused on the business

Vector #2: A technology delivery model built for flexibility and speed

Vector #3: A future-proof foundation of core tech systems that support innovation, collaboration, and security

To plot a company’s tech-transformation road map, we find the following questions particularly helpful:

  • What is your expectation from technology?
  • Which strategic outcomes are most critical (for example, speed and quality of delivery)?
  • Which are the most urgent pain points and what causes them?

The following questions help executives understand the current state of the technology function and its experience with transformation programs:

  • Which, if any, of the ten plays from the tech-forward approach are in place, and what is their maturity?
  • Is transforming your company’s tech one of the top two priorities in your C-suite? If not, why not?
  • How well does the technology function support your company’s strategic objectives or digital ambitions?
  • What tech-transformation efforts has your company launched to date? What effect have they had? What went well, and what didn’t?
  • What factors might restrict the pace of your tech-transformation efforts? In particular, how much capital and other resources can the company devote to tech transformation?

The current COVID-19 crisis, of course, is having a significant impact on how CIOs and businesses manage tech transformations. Despite the pressures it has added to costs, however, the urgency to get moving and transform has never been higher, according to many CIOs. But while the demands placed on the technology function have grown, so too have the opportunities. Experience suggests that the most effective transformations are not only comprehensive, covering the function’s role, delivery model, and core systems, but also sequenced to ensure that changes that reinforce each other are carried out together. With up-front planning focused on business value and careful delivery, a company can bring its technology function forward and gain the capabilities to thrive in challenging digital markets.

About the author(s)

Anusha Dhasarathy is a partner in McKinsey’s Chicago office, where Isha Gill is an associate partner and Naufal Khan is a senior partner; Sriram Sekar is a senior expert in the New Jersey office, where Steve Van Kuiken is a senior partner.

More: https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/mckinsey-digital/our-insights/how-to-become-tech-forward-a-technology-transformation-approach-that-works

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Reaction, Rebound, Recession, and Reimagination

There is opportunity in adversity in every business. It may seem callous to stress opportunity in the midst of a humanitarian crisis, but leaders have an obligation to look ahead, to anticipate and meet new customer needs, to evolve their strategies and organizations, and in so doing sustain the prosperity of their enterprises.

We should not expect that the resolution of the COVID-19 pandemic will be a return to a 2019 reality. For example, SARS is credited with being one of the accelerators for the adoption of e-commerce in China and the rise of Alibaba. Many organizations are understandably focused on reacting to and coping with the short-term challenges presented by the unfolding epidemic. (See Exhibit 1.) But in addition to reaction, they need to focus on three more important Rs: rebound, recession, and reimagination. Beyond individual companies, there is also an opportunity for society as a whole to reimagine norms, behaviors, and platforms for coordination and collaboration.

rebound of demand is inevitable, and using high-frequency data proxies for the movement of goods and people, production, and confidence, we can see that it is already beginning to happen in China. (See Exhibit 2.) Given the complexity of rebooting companies and supply chains at different speeds in different places, the time to begin preparing a rebound strategy is now. Over the past 100 years, epidemics have only temporarily deflected the economic cycle with short, sharp shocks. Of course, this time could be different. A bear market (technically, a 20% decline) does not guarantee a recession but indicates a high probability of one. The most recent expansionary cycle has been one of the longest in recent economic history, and signs of vulnerability were already showing in trade relations, political instability, corporate debt, and other areas. The shock to demand and confidence could easily tip the global economy into a recession.

Prudent companies will prepare for this possibility. Our analysis shows that 14% of companies across all sectors actually grow top and bottom lines during recessions and downturns. Those that flourish share the common traits of preparation, preemption, growth orientation, and long-term transformation. They take a long-term view and place growth bets when competitors are retrenching. And even after the epidemic recedes, and even in the case of recession, there will be opportunities and needs to reimagine business and operating models and also the portfolio of offerings. For the average company, the first casualty of a crisis is imagination. But those that shape and benefit from the future will be those that can imagine it.

More: https://www.bcg.com/pl-pl/

Authors:  Martin Reeves, Managing Director & Senior Partner, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, San Francisco; Lars Fæste, Managing Director & Senior Partner, Hong Kong; Kevin Whitaker, Economist, New York;  Mark Abraham, Managing Director & Senior Partner, Seattle