Makroekonomia Archive

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BCG Most Innovative Companies 2021

Coming out of COVID-19, companies want—and need—to innovate. But too few are ready to rise to the challenge.

Successful innovation takes three things. Making innovation a priority. Committing investment and talent to it. And being ready to transform investment into results. So how are the most innovative companies doing?

Innovation priority is up.

Let’s start with the good news. The number of companies reporting that innovation is among their organizations’ top three priorities is up 10 percentage points in 2021 to 75%—the largest year-over-year increase in the 15 global innovation surveys BCG has conducted since 2005.

But only about half of companies are investing behind their aspirations.

Priorities are good, but commitment counts, too. And just under half of the companies in our research report are putting real resources behind their priorities. We call these companies committed innovators.

An organization can create real value only if its underlying innovation system is ready to translate priority and commitment into results. On this dimension, the news is sobering.

Many committed innovators face a big readiness gap.

This year, we asked respondents a series of questions that enabled us to use BCG’s innovation-to-impact benchmarking framework (i2i by BCG) to assess the readiness of their innovation systems. A perfect i2i score is 100—and only about a quarter of committed innovators scored 80 or above. The median committed innovator fell short of best practice on every i2i dimension, sometimes significantly. And by definition, if that’s how the median performer fared, half of committed innovators score even lower. You can explore the dimensions of the readiness gap below and in the first chapter of our Most Innovative Companies 2021 report: “The Readiness Gap.”

Our analysis reveals that focusing on deficits in five of the ten i2i readiness areas are likely to have the greatest returns:

A focus on leadership and teaming can help close the readiness gap.

The five key elements of readiness highlighted above can be distilled into two overarching themes—leadership and teaming—each of which is the subject of a chapter of this year’s full Most Innovative Companies report.

Leadership.

Leading innovators drive results from a clear CEO agenda. And unambiguous C-level ownership distinguishes top performers from underperformers as measured by share of sales from new products and services. What should be on the CEO’s innovation agenda? We examine this question specifically in “The CEO Innovation Agenda,” the second chapter of this year’s report.

Teaming.

It’s also impossible to achieve innovation readiness without a strong link—indeed, a virtuous cycle of collaboration—between product development and facing functions. Establishing this cycle and keeping it active are perennial challenges. In fact, this year the global innovation executives we surveyed cited it as the top obstacle to achieving higher returns on innovation investment. Explore the stories of ten leading innovators that successfully maintain innovation’s connection with the marketplace in the third chapter of our Most Innovative Companies report: “How Leaders Bring Product and Sales Teams Together.”

Download the full report

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The future of air mobility: Electric aircraft and flying taxis

Look! Up in the sky! Not a bird … or a plane … it’s an eVTOL! An eVTOL (pronounced “ee-vee-tol”) is an electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft—and thousands of them could be flying above cities by 2030. Hear McKinsey experts and industry pioneers describe what’s coming in the world of “advanced air mobility” (AAM) and how it could affect passengers, pilots, and our planet.

By 2030, the leading companies in the passenger AAM industry could have bigger fleets—and offer many more flights per day—than the world’s largest airlines. Flights will be shorter, averaging only 18 minutes, with fewer passengers on board (between one and six, plus a pilot). That cadence—large numbers of aircraft flying frequent, short flights—will create operational challenges.

Flying taxis

More: https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/the-next-normal/air-taxis

 

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Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists

Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists

Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists took place via internet on November 18, 2021.

Cosmos Between West and East 18.11.2021 PROGRAMME

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McKinsey: Whats going on with shipping rates?

 

McKinsey’s Steve Saxon and Jaana Remes discuss why container shipping costs are surging and give their take on what lies ahead for the industry.

Video: https://www.mckinsey.com/Videos/video?vid=6266804341001&plyrid=HkOJqCPWdb

In this video conversation, Steve Saxon, McKinsey’s Shenzhen-based partner leading the Travel, Logistics & Infrastructure Practice in China, and Jaana Remes, a partner with the McKinsey Global Institute, discuss this puzzling phenomenon.

Watch the video to learn more about:

  • how changing consumption patterns in the United States are driving up demand for shipping and causing congestion in ports and the surrounding hinterland infrastructure
  • how the COVID-19 pandemic has led to port lockdowns and container ships being taken out of service, resulting in an overall reduction in shipping capacity
  • why the industry’s response of aggressively adding supply may not be the wisest move
  • the longer-term implications of the boom-and-bust cycle of shipping rates and when rates could be expected to normalize
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BCG Economic Resilience Is Built on Societal Well-Being

This article is the first in a series providing insight on why government leaders need to look beyond economic development and prioritize the overall well-being of citizens. The second article will explore how leaders can approach and tackle inequality, and the third will cover direct actions governments must take for the short- and long-term development of countries and their citizens.

One of the biggest lessons COVID-19 taught governments is that societal well-being makes countries more resilient. Nations that invest across a range of development dimensions—such as education, health, infrastructure, and governance—have been better able to cushion the socioeconomic fallout from the pandemic. Our analysis shows that countries with improved abilities to convert wealth into well-being as well as those with high overall well-being tended to mitigate drops in economic performance and limit the growth of unemployment rates during the first year of the pandemic. In contrast, countries with lower levels have fallen further behind, particularly in GDP growth and employment. This aligns with our previous research that shows countries better at converting wealth into well-being were able to recover more quickly from the 2008–2009 financial crisis.

Since 2012, BCG has ranked countries according to a proprietary economic development tool called the Sustainable Economic Development Assessment, or SEDA. (See “A Comprehensive Measure of Well-Being.”) A consistent finding from our research is that the more traditional metrics of economic development, which focus on GDP and other macroeconomic indicators, are not sufficient to gauge the true state of development in any society. Rather, countries need to take a more comprehensive and sustainable approach that incorporates and optimizes societal well-being. Viewed through this lens, SEDA analyses have shown that some lower-income countries are actually better off than high-income countries because they look beyond economic metrics and invest in well-being more broadly. COVID-19 brought in a new dimension—an opportunity to observe how such efforts make countries more resilient in a crisis.

A Comprehensive Measurement of Well-Being

Explore BCG’s rankings of national well-being