Logistyka Archive

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The future of air mobility: Electric aircraft and flying taxis

Look! Up in the sky! Not a bird … or a plane … it’s an eVTOL! An eVTOL (pronounced “ee-vee-tol”) is an electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft—and thousands of them could be flying above cities by 2030. Hear McKinsey experts and industry pioneers describe what’s coming in the world of “advanced air mobility” (AAM) and how it could affect passengers, pilots, and our planet.

By 2030, the leading companies in the passenger AAM industry could have bigger fleets—and offer many more flights per day—than the world’s largest airlines. Flights will be shorter, averaging only 18 minutes, with fewer passengers on board (between one and six, plus a pilot). That cadence—large numbers of aircraft flying frequent, short flights—will create operational challenges.

Flying taxis

More: https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/the-next-normal/air-taxis

 

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Baltic Sea & Space Cluster of HUBs in the BLUE ECONOMY

HUBy BSSC w GOSPODARCE MORSKIEJ w Raport gospodarczy TVP GDAŃSK: odc. 10.11.2021 redaguje PIOTR STEFANOWSKI

A zero-emission vessel production HUB and ICT & AI HUB were established

Czas na HUBy w polskiej gospodarce morskiej 

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Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists

Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists

Scientific conference “Cosmos: Between West and East” – dialogue of young stars, experts and scientists took place via internet on November 18, 2021.

Cosmos Between West and East 18.11.2021 PROGRAMME

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McKinsey: Whats going on with shipping rates?

 

McKinsey’s Steve Saxon and Jaana Remes discuss why container shipping costs are surging and give their take on what lies ahead for the industry.

Video: https://www.mckinsey.com/Videos/video?vid=6266804341001&plyrid=HkOJqCPWdb

In this video conversation, Steve Saxon, McKinsey’s Shenzhen-based partner leading the Travel, Logistics & Infrastructure Practice in China, and Jaana Remes, a partner with the McKinsey Global Institute, discuss this puzzling phenomenon.

Watch the video to learn more about:

  • how changing consumption patterns in the United States are driving up demand for shipping and causing congestion in ports and the surrounding hinterland infrastructure
  • how the COVID-19 pandemic has led to port lockdowns and container ships being taken out of service, resulting in an overall reduction in shipping capacity
  • why the industry’s response of aggressively adding supply may not be the wisest move
  • the longer-term implications of the boom-and-bust cycle of shipping rates and when rates could be expected to normalize
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BCG: Smart Ports

Over the past half century, the shipping industry has reinvented itself time and again, ushering in containerization, larger vessels, and electronic data interchange. Despite the improvements, aspects of port operations remain firmly anchored in the past, dependent on manual and paper-based systems.

But global trade isn’t standing still. Ever-increasing vessel sizes and cargo volumes continue to pressure ports and terminals, which must keep innovating just to keep up. Operators that want to maintain a competitive edge must adopt a digital mindset and implement smart-port technologies to stay productive, customer friendly, efficient, and competitive. Progressive ports are embracing the same digital breakthroughs that are disrupting other industries. Among those disrupters: connected platforms, cloud-based services, mobile devices and apps, sensors and other Internet of Things technologies, augmented reality, autonomous transportation, blockchain technology, and big data.

At the same time, port environments have become intricate partner networks that include port authorities, terminals, shipping lines, trucking and logistics companies, and off-dock storage providers. To be truly effective, stakeholders have to do more than simply adopt these technologies on their own. Instead, they must embrace platforms and services that make it easier for stakeholders to work together to promote the efficiency of the overall ecosystem.  These same platforms and services let individual partners expand their businesses without adding substantial new infrastructure or equipment. In some cases, the multistakeholder platforms also create digital-based services that can be used as new revenue sources.

Smart-port technologies’ impact can be substantial. At Germany’s Port of Hamburg, for example, wide-ranging connected-port initiatives are integral to a plan to double capacity—but not space—by 2025, simultaneously reducing operating costs for operators and logistics costs for cargo owners.

How Digital Helps Transform Ports and Terminals

Smart-port technologies are digital-based, multistakeholder systems. Port stakeholders can use these technologies to reconfigure basic functions and improve existing operations—to reengineer how work gets done—without major investments in new infrastructure and equipment. Accordingly, our review of smart-port technologies does not include traditional IT services, such as data standardization and systems integration, or systems such as terminal automation systems that serve only a single entry.

Smart technologies include systems that support basic infrastructure, as well as, for example, tools for handling cargo, managing traffic, dealing with customs, assuring safety, and monitoring energy use. Some benefit the gamut of port partners while others support specific partnerships between, for example, a port authority and terminal operators.

More: BCG.COM