Informatyka w Firmie Archive

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A blueprint for remote working: Lessons from China

As home to some of the world’s largest firms, China offers lessons for those that are just now starting to embrace the shift to remote working.

From Alibaba to Ping An and Google to Ford, companies around the globe are telling staff to work from home in a bid to stem the spread of COVID-19. Such remote working at scale is unprecedented and will leave a lasting impression on the way people live and work for many years to come. China, which felt the first impact of the pandemic, 2 was an early mover in this space. As home to some of the world’s largest firms, it offers lessons for those that are just now starting to embrace the shift. Working from home skyrocketed in China in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis as companies told their employees to stay home. Around 200 million people 4 were working remotely by the end of the Chinese New Year holiday. While this arrangement has some benefits, such as avoiding long commutes, many employees and companies found it challenging. One employee at an internet company quipped his work day changed from ‘996’ to ‘007,’ meaning from nine to nine, 6 days a week, to all the time. On the personal front, employees found it difficult to manage kids’ home-schooling via video conference while coordinating with remote colleagues. At a company level, many felt that productivity rapidly tailed off if not managed properly. This article brings together our experience helping clients navigate remote working, in-house analysis, and insights from conversations with executives in China as they responded to the situation and addressed the challenges. Done right, remote working can boost productivity and morale; done badly, it can breed inefficiency, damage work relationships, and demotivate employees. Here are eight learnings from China that may be applicable around the world, depending on the circumstances:

1. Designing an effective structure

2. Leading from afar

3.Instilling a caring culture

4. Finding a new routine

5. Supercharging ways of communicating

About the authors: Raphael Bick is a partner in McKinsey & Company’s Shanghai office, where Tianwen Yu is an associate partner. Michael Chang is an associate partner in McKinsey’s Beijing office. Kevin Wei Wang is a senior partner in McKinsey’s Hong Kong office.

More: https://www.mckinsey.com

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Numerous AmCham member companies are supporting coronavirus prevention and spread of the pandemic

We will update you with the actions taken and we encourage you to use solutions provided by our member companies to keep yourself, your employees and business partners safe and healthy. 
Cisco has expanded the list of features available as part of the free Webex – a tool enabling remote work, videoconferencing and much more. Additional features include support for up to 100 participants and unlimited number and time of meetings, document sharing. Take part in one of the free Webex webinars on March 20, 26 or 31 at 10 am. Registration link: Webex webinar. You can also access online  Webex guidelines
IBM  and  Cisco  joined forces with the leading Polish non-profit education organizations in the realm of education to support Polish teachers in running online classes for students staying at homes. Teachers will be provided with an access to Cisco Webex platform for online meetings at no cost and volunteers from IBM and Cisco will provide the necessary technical support and will assist teachers with the training needed to work with the platform and teach online.
Microsoft provides six-month free of charge version of Microsoft Teams – a tool for remote work (together with whole Office365 E1 package). Additionally numerous guidelines are available – not only how to install and use the software with  Microsoft FastTrack but also on  best practices in remote working and  safe home working. New  Microsoft Tech Community has been launched. Companies may also get help under dedicated email address:  zdalnie@microsoft.com

Deloitte offers online seminars free of charge. The upcoming ones are: 
> How to navigate the firm through a crisis? Online seminar: 20 March 2020, 1:00 PM- 2:00 PM Details, speakers and registration can be found here:  https://www2.deloitte.com/pl/pl/pages/webcasty/articles/COVID-19-odpornosc-biznesu.html?nc=1

> Coronavirus – key challenges and difficulties for entrepreneurs faced with the epidemic Online seminar: 23 March 2020 Details, speakers and registration can be found here:  https://www2.deloitte.com/pl/pl/pages/webcasty/articles/koronawirus-wyzwania-i-problemy.html

Dorota Dąbrowska-Winterscheid

Managing Director

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PWC: Global economic crime rates remain high as customer fraud continues to rise

  • 47% of companies report experiencing fraud in the last two years – the second highest reported level in 20 years
  • Customer fraud sees the biggest increase in the last two years, up from 29% to 35%
  • Customers, hackers and vendors/suppliers are responsible for 39% of all incidents in the last two years

Fraud and economic crime rates remain at record highs, impacting companies in more ways than ever. PwC’s bi-annual survey of business crime reports that fraud committed by customers tops the list of all crimes experienced (at 35%), up from 29% in 2018. Businesses report that customer fraud and cybercrime are the most disruptive of all the crimes. Although fraud committed by customers is on the rise, it is also one of the types where dedicated resources, robust processes and technology have proven most effective for prevention.

Globally, all regions experienced customer fraud in the last two years, with the Middle East (47% up from 27%) and North America (41% up from 32%) seeing the biggest increases. The Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey examines over 5000 responses from 99 countries. It reports on the overall insights from companies who have experienced on average six incidents over the last two years. The report provides insights into the threat, cost of fraud and what companies need to do to develop stronger proactive responses. The report highlights the importance of prevention and how investing in the right skillset and technology can create an advantage.  Nearly half of organisations responded to crime by implementing and enhancing controls, with 60% saying their organisations were better for it.

However nearly half of respondents did not conduct an investigation at all. Barely one third reported the crime to their board, but of the organisations who did, 53% ended up in a better place. “Fraud and economic crime is a never- ending battle. Getting to the root of the problem is key to preventing and dealing with future fraud. Whether it’s through technology, new processes, skills and training, or a combination – the result is strengthening business as a whole against crime, which is ultimately good for the consumer too.” comments Kristin Rivera, PwC Global Forensics Leader.

The perpetrators: Who’s committing the fraud

Fraud hits companies from all angles – the perpetrator could be internal, external or in many instances there is collusion.

  • In the last two years, 39% of respondents said external perpetrators were the main source of their economic crime incidents.
  • One in five respondents cited vendors/suppliers as the source of their most disruptive external fraud.
  • 13% of respondents who experienced fraud in the last two years reported losing more than US$50 million.
  • Antitrust, insider trading, tax fraud, money laundering,  and bribery and corruption are reported as being the top five costliest frauds in terms of direct losses – sometimes compounded by the significant cost of remediation.

Taking action and being prepared

While technology is just part of the answer in fighting fraud, the report finds that more than 60% of organisations are beginning to employ advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning to combat fraud, corruption or other economic crime. However, concerns about deploying technology are linked to cost, insufficient expertise and limited resources. 28% say it’s because they struggle to see its value. The benefit in using technology to fight fraud is undeniable but organisations must recognise that using tools or technology alone does not amount to an anti-fraud programme. “Collecting the right data is just the first step. How the data is analysed is where companies will have an advantage when fighting fraud. Companies often fail to see the value in technology when they don’t invest in the right skills and expertise to manage it” comments Kristin Rivera, PwC Global Forensics Leader.


Notes: Download the report at www.pwc.com/fraudsurvey.

Customer fraud is defined as fraud against a company through illegitimate use of, or deceptive practices associated with, its products or services by customers or others (e.g. mortgage fraud, credit card fraud).

Cybercrime features in the top three most disruptive crimes experienced in almost all industries reported in the survey – Financial Services (15%), Industrial Manufacturing and Automotive (15%), Technology, Media and Telecommunications (20%), Consumer Markets (16%), Government and public sector (17%), Health Industries (16%).

Globally, all regions report experiencing customer fraud in the last two years:  Middle East (47%), Africa (42%), Asia Pacific (31%), Europe (33%), Latin America (33%), North America (41%).

PwC highlighted the global issue of upskilling in its 23rd CEO survey and identified that whilst retraining/upskilling was seen as the best way to close the skills gap, only 18% of CEOs have made ‘significant progress’ in establishing an upskilling programme. In order to take advantage of what technology can do for your organization, hiring the right people to work alongside new technologies is important. This is apparent even when hiring staff to support advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning to uncover fraud

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Solving the digital and analytics scale-up challenge in consumer goods

Many consumer-goods companies have entered the digital and analytics race, but very few are scaling impact. Here’s what leaders are doing right.

Ask any consumer-goods executive if his or her company has invested in digital and analytics, and you’ll almost certainly get an affirmative response. But ask whether those investments have yielded the desired results—and more than half of the time the answer will be no. Our research shows that only 40 percent of consumer-goods companies that have made digital and analytics investments are achieving returns above the cost of capital. The rest are stuck in “pilot purgatory,” eking out small wins but failing to make an enterprise-wide impact. The value at stake isn’t trivial: our analysis suggests that a company’s aptitude at scaling up digital and analytics programs is correlated with its financial performance. In this article, we describe the most common pitfalls that companies encounter in their journey toward digital and analytics scale-up. We also explore an emerging recipe for sustained success.

Measuring digital and analytics maturity—and its value

The consumer-goods industry has some catching up to do when it comes to digital maturity. Among 11 industries analyzed in the latest McKinsey Digital Quotient 1 survey, consumer goods ranks third lowest (Exhibit 1). The industry does much better in a comparison of analytics maturity, coming in at fifth place. This isn’t surprising: most consumer-goods companies have focused on established analytical areas (such as pricing) that require relatively little direct consumer data. Sectors with more direct consumer connections, such as retail, have focused more on digital capabilities to enable an omnichannel consumer experience. Within the consumer-goods industry, the companies with the highest levels of digital and analytics maturity are creating significant value. Between 2010 and 2018, the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for the total shareholder returns (TSR) of the most mature digital and analytics performers—those in the top quintile—was 19.2 percent, approximately 60 percent higher than the 12.3 percent CAGR for bottom-quintile companies. While that analysis doesn’t prove causality, the correlation is compelling. And in light of the growth challenge that the industry is up against, the call to action is loud and clear: either fully tap into the power of digital and analytics, or get left behind.

Drawing on our experience working with consumer-goods players around the world, we have identified the four most common failure modes—the mistakes that hinder organizations from capturing value at scale from digital and analytics:

  • Neglecting to connect digital and analytics programs to the enterprise strategy. Laggards tend to treat digital and analytics efforts as side projects rather than important enablers of enterprise-wide priorities. Not surprisingly, these efforts struggle to get the attention and resources they require to succeed.
  • Making big investments prematurely. Some companies, enamored of having the latest technology, invest in digital and analytics before they thoroughly understand what the business truly needs and what will deliver significant impact. This failure mode tends to come in two flavors: a company either pursues a costly, all-encompassing “data lake,” without carefully thinking through exactly what that data lake will enable, or invests in a new technology stack in efforts to simplify or harmonize core platforms (such as enterprise-resource-planning systems), only to find that today’s best-in-class tech stack becomes outdated just two years later.
  • Holding out for “perfect” hires. Laggards spend as much as six months searching for two or three data scientists or wait until they feel they’ve found the “perfect” hire to lead the team. While it’s not wrong to look for the best data scientists, data engineers, designers, and other skilled people to fill critical roles, there are several ways to accelerate progress while building your technical bench—such as training internal talent, disaggregating roles, or partnering for new capabilities.
  • Underinvesting in change management. Executives often tell us that they wish they’d spent as much or more on change management as they did on technology. Without senior business leaders committed to role modeling the changes and a comprehensive plan for encouraging adoption by frontline employees, new techniques won’t stick. As a rule of thumb, digital and analytics leaders should allocate their energy and investment as follows: 25 percent on data, 25 percent on technology, and 50 percent on change management.

MORE: www.mckinsey.com

About the authors: Ford Halbardier is an associate partner in McKinsey’s Dallas office, where Brian Henstorf is a partner; Robert Levin is partner in the Boston office; and Aldo Rosales is an associate partner in the Mexico City office.

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How to Turn AI into ROI

After several decades of progress, AI technology is now poised to become a sig-nificant source of value for a wide range of businesses. In the 2019 MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Artificial Intelligence Global Executive Study and Research Report, 9 out of 10 respondents agree that AI represents a business opportunity for their company.In addition, a growing number of leaders view AI as not just an opportunity but also a strategic risk: “What if competitors, particularly unencumbered new entrants, figure out AI before we do?” In 2019, 45% perceived some risk from AI, up from an already substantial 37% in 2017. This shift suggests an increasing awareness of and concern with competitors’ use of AI. In China, perceived risk from AI is even higher.Significant challenges remain, however. Many AI initiatives fail. Seven out of 10 companies surveyed report minimal or no impact from AI so far. Among the 90% of companies that have made at least some investment in AI, fewer than 2 out of 5 report obtaining any business gains from AI in the past three years. This number improves to 3 out of 5 when we include companies that have made signifi-cant investments in AI. Even so, this means 40% of organizations making significant investments in AI do not report business gains from AI.The crux is that while some companies have clearly figured out how to be successful, most compa-nies have a hard time generating value with AI. As a result, many executives find themselves facing a set of AI realities: AI is a source of untapped opportunity, it is an existential risk, and it is difficult. Above all, it is an urgent issue to address. How can executives exploit the opportunities, manage the risks, and minimize the difficulties associated with AI? How should they navigate all three factors?

Our findings — based on a survey of more than 2,500 executives and 17 interviews with leading experts — provide a data-driven view of what organizations that succeed with AI are doing and what real success with AI looks like. Companies that cap-ture value from their AI activities exhibit a distinct set of organizational behaviors. They:•Integrate their AI strategies with their overall business strategy.•Take on large, often risky, AI efforts that priori-tize revenue growth over cost reduction.•Align the production of AI with the consump-tion of AI, through thoughtful alignment of business owners, process owners, and AI ex-pertise to ensure that they adopt AI solutions effectively and pervasively.•Unify their AI initiatives with their larger busi-ness transformation efforts.•Invest in AI talent, data, and process change in ad-dition to (and often more so than) AI technology. They recognize AI is not all about technology. More: www.bcg.com

More: Winning With AI. Pioneers Combine Strategy, Organizational Behavior, and Technology. OCTOBER 2019RESEARCH REPORT, By Sam Ransbotham, Shervin Khodabandeh, Ronny Fehling, Burt LaFountain, and David Kiron.