Anti-equilibrium Archive

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BCG Report: Are You Making the Most of Your Relationship with AI?

Management Review suggests that in order to see significant financial returns, organizations need a multidimensional, complex relationship with AI—one that involves several methods of learning and different modes of interaction.

Businesses everywhere are recognizing the power of AI to improve processes, meet customer needs, enter new spaces, and, above all, to gain sustainable competitive advantage. With this recognition has come an increased adoption of—and investment in—AI technologies. A global survey of more than 3,000 executives revealed that more than half of respondents are deploying AI: six out of ten have an AI strategy in 2020, up from four out of ten in 2018. AI solutions are more prolific and easier to deploy than ever before, and companies around the globe are seizing on the opportunity to keep up with this exciting trend. Yet despite their efforts—to hire data scientists, develop algorithms, and optimize processes and decision making—most companies aren’t seeing a significant return on their investments.

So, what allows a small number of companies to stand out from the crowd?

For them, AI isn’t just a path to automation; it’s an integral, strategic component of their businesses. To achieve significant financial benefits, companies must look beyond the initial, albeit fundamental, steps of AI adoption—of having the right data, technology, and talent in place, and organizing these elements around a corporate strategy. Currently, companies have only a 21% chance of achieving significant benefits with these fundamentals alone, though incorporating the ability to iterate on AI solutions with business users nearly doubles the number, to 39%. But it’s the final stage of AI maturity, of successfully orchestrating the macro and micro interactions between humans and machines, that really unlocks value. The ability to learn as an organization—by bringing together human brains and the logic of machines—is what gives companies a 73% chance of reaping the financial benefits of AI implementation.

More: To embrace AI’s full potential, companies must recognize that humans play an equally important role in the equation—and reshape themselves accordingly. Download the Full Report

Authors: Sam Ransbotham, Associate Professor, Boston College/MIT Sloan Management Review; Shervin Khodabandeh, Managing Director & Senior Partner, Los Angeles; David Kiron, Executive Editor, MIT Sloan Management Review’s Big Ideas initiatives; François Candelon, Managing Director & Senior Partner, Global Director of the BCG Henderson Institute
Paris; Michael Chu, Partner and Associate Director, Data Science, Silicon Valley – Bay Area; Burt LaFountain, Managing Director & Partner, Boston

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Athens Journal of Business & Economics

We are glad to announce that the January issue (Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2021) of the Athens Journal of Business & Economics (AJBE) has been uploaded: https://www.athensjournals.gr/ajbe/v7i1. Below you can find the table of contents. The AJBE sponsors the following academic events:

  • 14th Annual International Conference on Global Studies, 18-21 December 2020, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/cbc)
  • 8th Annual International Conference on Business, Law & Economics, 3-6 May 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/ble)
  • 16th Annual International Symposium on Economic Theory, Policy and Application, 28-30 June & 1 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/economics)
  • 19th Annual International Conference on Management, 28-30 June & 1 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/management)
  • 19th Annual International Conference on Marketing, 28-30 June & 1 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/marketing)
  • 19th Annual International Conference on Accounting, 5-8 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/accounting)
  • 19th Annual International Conference on Finance, 5-8 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/finance)
  • 8th Annual International Conference on SΜΕs, Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Management – Marketing – Economic – Social Aspects 26-29 July 2021, Athens, Greece (https://www.atiner.gr/sme)

You are more than welcome to submit a proposal for presentation. Please note that the program of the December conference on Global Studies is available at: https://www.atiner.gr/2020cbc-pro. Late submissions for this event will be accepted by the end of November. ATINER has decided to offer the option of remote (online or pre-recorded) presentation for those who cannot travel for objective or subjective reasons. If you need more information, please let me know, and our administration will send it to you including the abstract submission form. Finally, you are welcome to contribute to the AJBE with an original research paper.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Download the entire issue (PDF)
Front Pages i-viii
Labor Productivity in France: Is the Slowdown of its Growth Inevitable or are there Levers to fight it?
Catherine Bruneau & Pierre-Luis Girard
9
The Never-Ending Quest for the European Fiscal Policy’s Objectives: Stability vs. Convergence or Stability and Convergence?
Carlo Klein
41
Sustainable Governance and Knowledge-based Economy – Prerequisites for Sustainable Development of the Developing and Transitional Economies
Kristina Jovanova
67
Outcomes from Building Transparency in Governance in a Smart City Project in India: A Case Study of Panaji, Goa
Mridula Goel & Sheetal Thomas
85
The Sustainable Development Goals and Leading European Retailers
Peter Jones & Daphne Comfort
105

Dr Zoe Boutsioli
____________________________________________________________
Dr Zoe Boutsioli  Vice President of Publications ATINER (A World Association of Academics and Researchers).
25 Years of Non-Euclidean Improvement “Our city is open to the world, we never expel a foreigner from learning or seeing” “τήν τε γὰρ πόλιν κοινὴν παρέχομεν, καὶ οὐκ ἔστιν ὅτε ξενηλασίαις ἀπείργομέν τινά ἢ μαθήματος ἢ θεάματος” Pericles’ Funeral Oration from Thucydides, “The Peloponnesian War”. Come to open to the world Athens to learn about Democracy in the city where its theory was first developed and taught and see the place (phnyx) where it was first practiced.

Please note that as a world association of academics and researchers with a very specific mission (please see our website), ATINER is based on the voluntary work of our members and friends. This includes the toil of sending this email to you, so please let us know if you are not interested so that our work is not in vain. If you no longer want to receive emails from us, please click unsubscribe below. This way you will avoid the nuisance of receiving emails from ATINER.

 

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Business 5.0

Business 5.0 to przyszłość, następny krok w biznesowej rewolucji, nadchodząca zmiana w strukturze firmy, procesach biznesowych i kulturze pracy. Business 4.0 to przeszłość.

Wykorzystanie potencjału – Automatyzacja

Większość firm nie zdaje sobie sprawy z tego, jak dużym potencjałem dysponuje. A nawet jeśli – nie potrafi go  wykorzystać. Przyszłość to automatyzacja (Intelligent Automation – IA), która pozwala na usprawnienie codziennych działań. To wykorzystanie wielu technologii, zaczynając od automatyzacji procesów biznesowych (Robotic Process Automation –  RPA) przez uczenie maszynowe, automatyzację kognitywną oraz wykorzystanie sztucznej inteligencji.

 Rozwiązanie to pozwala na obniżenie kosztów w firmie, wyeliminowanie ryzyka błędów, poprawienie jakości danych  oraz zwiększenie szybkości i jakości obsługi naszych klientów. To także szansa na zaoszczędzenie czasu pracowników, dzięki zastąpieniu ich w rutynowych czynnościach, by ci mogli zająć się zadaniami wymagającymi kreatywności. Automatyzacja umożliwia też oferowanie dodatkowych usług bez zwiększania liczby pracowników. 

·         Wykorzystanie potencjału – Automatyzacja

·         Produktywność i wydajność – Sztuczna Inteligencja

·         Klient przyszłości – zmieniające się potrzeby

·         Wykorzystanie Big Data

·         Przyszłość rynku pracy – ludzie nie roboty

·         Koncepcja Internetu Rzeczy

·         Cyberbezpieczeństwo

Zob np. EY: Usługi doradcze w zakresie inteligentnej automatyzacji

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Three actions CEOs can take to get value from cloud computing

Leaders need to accelerate their journey to the cloud in order to digitize quickly and effectively in the wake of COVID-19.

If you are a CEO, you already know what the cloud can do for your business in a post-COVID-19 world. You’ve probably even told your organization to get you there already. So why is your move to the cloud 1 coming along so slowly, even though you may have been talking about it for years? It might be because you and your management team have yet to take a sufficiently active role, or provide the air cover your chief information officer (CIO) and chief technology officer (CTO) need.

CIOs and CTOs are on the front foot right now thanks to their crucial role during the COVID-19 pandemic. That makes this a good moment to further elevate top-team support for the cloud enablement needed to accelerate digital strategy, the digitization of the company, its channels of distribution, and its supply chains—all of which already needed to be moving more quickly than they were.

The CEO’s role is crucial because no one else can broker across the multiple parties involved, which include the CIO, CTO, CFO, chief human-resources officer (CHRO), chief information security officer (CISO), and business-unit leads. As we explain in this article, the transition to cloud computing represents a collective-action problem—one that requires a coordinated effort across the team at the top of an organization. It’s a matter of orchestration, in other words, and only CEOs can wield the baton.

To get to cloud more quickly, CEOs should ask their CIO and CTO what support they need to lead the organization on the journey. Chances are good that three interventions will emerge:

  1. establishing a sustainable funding model to support the investments required to get business value from the cloud
  2. developing a new business-technology operating model that exploits cloud for speed, agility, and efficient scalability
  3. putting in place the HR, compensation, and location policies required to attract and retain the specialized engineering talent required to operate in the cloud

By Chhavi Arora, Tanguy Catlin, Will Forrest, James Kaplan, and Lars Vinter

More: mckinsey-digital

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McKinsey Survey: Consumer sentiment on sustainability in fashion

While the fashion industry is reorganizing for the next normal after the COVID-19 crisis, European consumers have become even more engaged in sustainability topics. That presents an opportunity for the fashion industry to reiterate its commitment to sustainability. Moreover, now could be the moment to drive less seasonality in the fashion system.

Our survey was conducted in April 2020 across more than 2,000 UK and German consumers. 1 It is part of a firmwide effort to capture consumer sentiment during the COVID-19 crisis.

Sentiment toward sustainability. Amid the shock and uncertainty that the fashion sector is facing during the COVID-19 crisis, there is a silver lining for the environment: two-thirds of surveyed consumers state that it has become even more important to limit impacts on climate change. Additionally, 88 percent of respondents believe that more attention should be paid to reducing pollution. In practice, consumers have already begun changing their behaviors accordingly. Of consumers surveyed, 57 percent have made significant changes to their lifestyles to lessen their environmental impact, and more than 60 percent report going out of their way to recycle and purchase products in environmentally friendly packaging (Exhibit 1).

We strive to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to our website. If you would like information about this content we will be happy to work with you. Please email us at: McKinsey_Website_Accessibility@mckinsey.com

Emphasis on social and environmental commitments

While the industry is reorganizing for the next normal, it should consider that consumers want fashion players to uphold their social and environmental responsibilities amid the crisis. Of surveyed consumers, 67 percent consider the use of sustainable materials to be an important purchasing factor, and 63 percent consider a brand’s promotion of sustainability in the same way. Additionally, surveyed consumers expect brands to take care of their employees, as well as workers in Asia, during the COVID-19 crisis. That highlights the need for brands to maintain ethical commitments, despite the crisis. We strive to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to our website. If you would like information about this content we will be happy to work with you. Please email us at: McKinsey_Website_Accessibility@mckinsey.com

Overall, it is imperative to build trust and transparency with consumers, as 70 percent are sticking with brands they know and trust during the crisis. Of surveyed consumers, 75 percent consider a trusted brand to be an important purchasing factor. However, younger consumers, particularly Gen Zers and millennials, are more likely to experiment with smaller or lesser-known brands during the crisis.

By Anna Granskog, Libbi Lee, Karl-Hendrik Magnus, and Corinne Sawers

More: McKinsey; About the authors: Anna Granskog is a partner in McKinsey’s Helsinki office, Libbi Lee and Corinne Sawers are associate partners in the London office, and Karl-Hendrik Magnus is a senior partner in the Frankfurt office.