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Zero-emission strategy and digitization of maritime logistics

Zero-emission strategy and digitization of maritime logistics – strategic course of the Baltic Sea and Space Cluster

Representatives of large, medium and small companies, maritime education, media representatives and managers of HUBs of the Baltic Sea and Space Cluster met in Gdynia for a business breakfast on December 7 this year. Due to the prevailing pandemic and the safety of the participants, 25 people participated in the meeting.

The meeting was attended, among others, by Przemysław Sztandera, president of the Pomeranian Special Economic Zone and prof. Adam Weintrit, rector of Gdynia Maritime University, lawyer Matusz Romowicz from Legal Marine, and Piotr Witek from Moore Rewit, Captain Alfred Naskręt, director of the Gdynia Maritime School, Monika Kozakiewicz and Adam Potrykus, Nauta Shipyard presidents, and Jacek Milewski, Shipyard Crist , Chief Financial Officer.

The Hydromega company was represented by director Michałowski. Jakub Roszkiewicz (Biprograf) and Wojciech Panfil (Elmech-ASE) came from the ASE Technology Group. Marcin Więckowski and Robert Widomski were from Whizzbrand. The meeting was attended by Maciej Spigarski, a long-term sales director of the well-known manufacturer of Galeon yachts. There was also the Cluster Management Board and representatives of the Cluster Projects Office. The media was represented by Cezary Spigarski, President of the Management Board of the Foundation for the Promotion of Ship Industry and Maritime Economy, publisher of the OficynaMorska.pl portal and Mateusz Kowalewski, president of the board, publisher of GospodarkaMorska.pl and MarinePoland.com.

Capt. Alfred Naskręt and prof. Marek Grzybowski welcomed the participants of the meeting. The Baltic Sea and Space Cluster has carried out fundamental organizational changes and has transformed into a cluster of innovative HUBs. This is a consequence of the evolution of the cluster that changed the traditional Triple Helix cluster into the HUB of international projects ten years ago. Projects are carried out with porters from the Baltic Sea region and with clusters operating under the European Cluster Collaboration Platform.

– We have transformed into a “Cluster” of hubs, i.e. specialist organizations with a high innovation potential – said Marek Grzybowski, president of the Baltic Sea and Space Cluster for the GospodarkaMorska portal, emphasizing that it is planned to prepare projects that will be implemented for the needs of the international market.

 

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McK: The CEO moment Leadership for a new era

COVID-19 has created a massive humanitarian challenge: millions ill and hundreds of thousands of lives lost; soaring unemployment rates in the world’s most robust economies; food banks stretched beyond capacity; governments straining to deliver critical services. The pandemic is also a challenge for businesses—and their CEOs—unlike any they have ever faced, forcing an abrupt dislocation of how employees work, how customers behave, how supply chains function, and even what ultimately constitutes business performance.

Confronting this unique moment, CEOs have shifted how they lead in expedient and ingenious ways. The changes may have been birthed of necessity, but they have great potential beyond this crisis. In this article, we explore four shifts in how CEOs are leading that are also better ways to lead a company: unlocking bolder (“10x”) aspirations, elevating their “to be” list to the same level as “to do” in their operating models, fully embracing stakeholder capitalism, and harnessing the full power of their CEO peer networks. If they become permanent, these shifts hold the potential to thoroughly recalibrate the organization and how it operates, the company’s performance potential, and its relationship to critical constituents.

Only CEOs can decide whether to continue leading in these new ways, and in so doing seize a once-in-a-generation opportunity to consciously evolve the very nature and impact of their role. Indeed, as we have written elsewhere, part of the role of the CEO is to serve as a chief calibrator—deciding the extent and degree of change needed. As part of this, CEOs must have a thesis of transformation that works in their company context. A good CEO is always scanning for signals and helping the organization deliver fine-tuned responses. A great CEO will see that this moment is a unique opportunity for self-calibration, with profound implications for the organization.

We have spoken with and counseled hundreds of CEOs since the pandemic first hit. It is clear to us that they sense an opportunity to lead in a new, more positive and impactful way. If a critical mass of CEOs embraces and extends what they have learned during the pandemic, this CEO moment could become a CEO movement—one that is profoundly positive for the achievement of corporate, human, and societal potential. As Rajnish Kumar, chairman of the State Bank of India, reflects, “This will be a true inflection point. I think that this pandemic, in terms of implications, will be as big an event as World War II. And whatever we learn through this process, it must not go to waste.”

(…)

Invest further in building relationships with other CEOs

CEOs are communicating more, and expanding their networks, in part because only another CEO confronting the pandemic can fully identify with today’s leadership challenges. As Laxman Narasimhan, CEO of Reckitt Benckiser, puts it: “I find talking to other CEOs about how they are handling the crisis extremely helpful—this shared experience connects us and gives me added perspectives.” Says AmerisourceBergen CEO Steve Collis, “From an external perspective, I’ve been a beneficiary of amazing calls with other CEOs who have been willing to share their knowledge. This has been such a growing experience.”

Hospital CEOs realized we were chasing each other around the supply chains [hunting for PPE]. So we began to coordinate. It became almost a daily call.

— Kate Walsh, CEO, Boston Medical Center

It’s no surprise that CEOs are seeing the benefits of connecting in new ways during this crisis. The urgency of the moment has given focus and urgency to the nature of the dialogue. Kate Walsh, CEO of Boston Medical Center, started talking to her peers early in the pandemic, when Boston was becoming one of the country’s COVID-19 hot spots. “Hospital CEOs realized we were chasing each other around the supply chains,” says Walsh. “We began to coordinate, so at least we could let people know that we’d give everybody a mask when they come to work on Monday morning. It became almost a daily call [with other hospitals] as we tried to figure out how to respond to the volume of cases.” Leaders are less focused on showing up to large group meetings and putting on a corporate face that suggests “We’ve got it under control.” Instead, they are intent on accelerating problem solving together by building on one another’s ideas, iterating novel solutions to use in the workplace, trading notes, and moving forward having learned what works best. They are also encouraging one another to conduct bold experiments, taking advantage of the current environment to do A/B testing on a massive scale and trying new ways of operating virtually and digitally.

In order for CEOs to leverage such interactions in the future and accelerate impact on shared challenges, they will have to continue to approach such opportunities—both formal and informal—with humility, a learning mindset, and an open-minded commitment to ongoing development. The benefits of doing so are more significant than one might imagine: role modeling this has the potential to create more open learning organizations for companies, and to identify the cross-industry analogies that often provide the touchstone for innovation. Without the pressure of a crisis, however, leadership resolve will be required to maintain such an approach—research makes it clear that none of this is easy for people in powerful roles.

In light of the newfound connectivity among CEOs within and across industries happening in this moment, CEOs will benefit from reflecting on the following questions:

  • What peer networks should I continue or create beyond the crisis (in particular, those in analogous but not identical situations)?
  • What makes for a valuable peer interaction, and how can I ensure that these conditions are in place when I interact with other CEOs?
  • Beyond role modeling, how can I encourage my senior team and other leaders to enrich their own networks and the velocity of learnings with their peers across industries?

Leverage networks to tackle a broad set of issues

CEO networks also have a unique potential to enable some of the other things we have talked about thus far in this article. CEOs in noncompetitive industries are well positioned to both challenge and support their peers in aiming higher; in sharing learnings, best practices, and encouragement regarding elevating “to be” to the same level as “to do”; and in working through how to fully embrace stakeholder capitalism.

COVID-19 has brought with it a pressurized operating environment the likes of which few of today’s CEOs have ever experienced—it has “unfrozen” many aspects of the CEO role.

The pharmaceutical industry’s “10x” rush to counter COVID-19 bears witness to this. As Christophe Weber, CEO of Takeda Pharmaceuticals, explains, “We started the development of a plasma-derived medicine for COVID-19 by ourselves. But our head of Plasma-Derived Therapies realized that if we formed an alliance with other plasma companies, we could go much faster and would have the potential to produce a product on a bigger scale. So now we have a pro bono, not-for-profit alliance. And we have a very good alliance with other major plasma companies, smaller ones, and also nonplasma companies, like Microsoft. When everybody saw that it was a true alliance to do good for society, we were able to get the convergence of many companies.”

This interest in shared success can create wins for multiple stakeholders. “Part [of the adjustment to COVID-19] is focusing even more on partnering with and supporting the community,” says CCHMC’s Fisher. “For example, CEOs of major employers, including P&G, Kroger, Fifth Third Bank, Cincinnati Children’s, and others, initiated a task force to focus on a robust and inclusive restart of our economy and region. Being part of those things is more important than ever to me, our institution, and our community.”

Alain Bejjani of MAF frames the potential for CEOs to work together in ways that change the world for the better. Says Bejjani, “Employers enjoy the highest level of trust compared to governments and even NGOs [nongovernmental organizations]. This capital of trust is very important and something CEOs should leverage going forward. We should be at the bridgehead for change. Governments cannot win, cannot deal with the complex issues of our time, without business. Business, in turn, cannot win without government and civil society.” As COVID-19 has made clear, changing the world for the better is good not only for society but also for business.

As CEOs look forward to decide what issues to tackle with their peers, they can build on their pandemic experience by considering the following questions:

  • On what issues has peer connectivity most benefited my business, now and in the future?
  • On what societal issues (such as inequity and racism, climate change, porous social safety nets, weakened healthcare systems) should peer connectivity be directed, and how can I maintain the same level of intensity that I did during the pandemic?
  • What issues will I take personal leadership on and convene others around?

COVID-19 has brought with it a pressurized operating environment the likes of which few of today’s CEOs have ever experienced. It has necessitated a reappraisal of how much is possible and in what time frames. It has forced personal disclosure at levels previously considered uncomfortable and, in doing so, has increased awareness of the importance of how leaders show up personally. It has shined a light on the interconnectivity of stakeholder concerns. It has prompted a level of substance-based, peer-to-peer CEO interaction that has elevated all involved. Ultimately, it has “unfrozen” many aspects of the CEO role, making possible a re-fusing of new and existing elements that could define the CEO role of the future.

When the pressure decreases, will CEOs go back to operating as they did before? Or will the role at the top be thoughtfully reconsidered and reconceived by those who occupy it? Clearly, not every CEO will choose to make permanent the four shifts we’ve discussed. The more that CEOs do, however, the more the moment has the potential to become a movement—one that could create higher-achieving, more purposeful, more humane, and better-connected leaders. Judging by the evolution underway, many companies and societies stand to benefit.

About the authors: Carolyn Dewar is a senior partner in McKinsey’s San Francisco office, Scott Keller is a senior partner in the Southern California office, Kevin Sneader is McKinsey’s global managing partner and is based in the Hong Kong office, and Kurt Strovink is a senior partner in the New York office.

The authors wish to thank Monica Murarka for her contributions to this article.

More: McKinsey.com

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EY Co to jest hiperautomatyzacja?

Hiperautomatyzacja to koncepcja polegająca na zastosowaniu ekosystemu zaawansowanych technologii automatyzacyjnych poprzez wykorzystanie posiadanego potencjału przedsiębiorstwa. Do 2024 r. firmy, dzięki niej, mogą obniżyć swoje koszty operacyjne nawet o 30% [1].

O czym przeczytasz?

  • Czym jest hiperautomatyzacja i dlaczego nie powinna być mylona z automatyzacją?
  • W jaki sposób pozwala na kompleksową transformację firm?
  • Jak wdrożyć hiperautomatyzację: krok po kroku oraz przykłady jej wykorzystania.

Co to jest hiperautomatyzacja?

Hiper automatyzacja to kompleksowe wykorzystanie dostępnych narzędzi z zakresu automatyzacji, sztucznej inteligencji oraz Business Intelligence, które ma na celu przekształcenie oraz stworzenie nowych procesów (transformację cyfrową przedsiębiorstwa), co przy użyciu tradycyjnych metod byłoby niewykonalne.

Termin hiper automatyzacja lub hiperautomatyzacja pojawił się po raz pierwszy w październiku 2019 r., zajmując pierwsze miejsce na liście 10 najlepszych strategicznych trendów technologicznych na rok 2020 [1].

W ramach hiperautomatyzacji wykorzystywana jest wspomniana już sztuczna inteligencja (ang. Artificial Intelligence, AI), a także uczenie maszynowe (ang. Machine Learning, ML) i zrobotyzowana automatyzacja procesów (ang. Robotic Process Automation, RPA). Jej celem jest automatyzacja powtarzalnych i czasochłonnych zadań.

Hiperautomatyzacja dotyczy jednak nie tylko procesów, które można zautomatyzować, ale także poziomu automatyzacji, który często jest określany jako kolejna ważna faza transformacji cyfrowej.

Jak działa hiperautomatyzacja?

Pierwsza fala technologii automatyzacji opierała się w dużej mierze na technologii RPA (ang. Robotic Process Automation, RPA), które polega na wykorzystaniu botów do naśladowania powtarzalnych, ludzkich czynności. Procesy te są oparte na określonych regułach i wykorzystują uporządkowane dane do wykonywania działań. W przeciwieństwie do RPA: sztuczna inteligencja (ang. Artificial Intelligence, AI) stara się symulować ludzki intelekt.

Hiperautomatyzacja łączy technologie: RPA, Low/No code, BI, ML oraz AI, co umożliwia automatyzację praktycznie każdego powtarzalnego zadania, przez co staje się ona idealnym narzędziem do osiągnięcia cyfrowej transformacji organizacji.

 

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McKinsey – Global Economics Intelligence executive summary, February 2021

Countries are now able to assess the damage to economic growth wrought in 2020 by the restrictions put in place to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus. All GEI-surveyed economies went into reverse gear in the early months of the year; only China was able to control the virus sufficiently to come out of 2020 with positive economic growth (+2.3% year-over-year). The US economy experienced a GDP contraction of –3.5%; the eurozone as a whole contracted –5.4% (flash estimate), with contractions of –5.0% in Germany, –8.3% in France, –8.8% in Italy, and –11.0% in Spain. The Russian economy, propelled by energy exports, experienced a milder contraction of –3.1%; Brazil’s contraction is expected to be –4.7% and India’s –7.7%.

Economic activity mirrored the fluctuations in pandemic restrictions: many countries loosened restrictions after midyear and experienced strong third-quarter growth. As the number of COVID-19 cases surged again, measures were reimposed, curtailing growth in the last quarter of the year. China was, of course, the exception, as it had controlled the virus early in the second quarter; by the last quarter, the economy was humming at 6.5% y-o-y growth. To a certain extent, China’s success has radiated outward, with demand from China helping to support global manufacturing and trade. This dynamic was underscored in January and February by some deceleration in global indicators in consequence of the new-year holiday in China.

In the most recent available data, consumer-sentiment indicators were subdued or pessimistic in most surveyed economies; in China, however, consumer confidence strengthened. Retail-sales growth was very strong in the United States (+5.3% month-over-month), aided by individual stimulus payments; in China, retail sales expanded 4.6%; elsewhere, consumer spending retreated or is making slower progress (Exhibit 1).

As measured by global purchasing managers indexes (PMIs), growth in both manufacturing and services eased in January. Among surveyed economies, manufacturing PMIs remain strong. Services PMIs in the United States and Russia experienced strong growth; in China, the indicator slowed in advance of the new-year holiday; for the eurozone and Brazil, contraction is indicated.

World trade volumes now exceed prepandemic levels: as measured by the CPB World Trade Monitor, global volumes increased 0.6% in December 2020 and 1.6% in November; the indicator showed a trade expansion of 11.5% in the third quarter of 2020 and 4.0% in the fourth quarter (after contractions of –2.6% and –11.7% in the first and second quarters, respectively, figures revised). The Container Throughput Index declined slightly to 119 in December (121.1 in November); a seasonal retreat was measured in Chinese ports.

More: https://www.mckinsey.com/

About the authors:The data and analysis in McKinsey’s Global Economics Intelligence are developed by Alan FitzGerald, a director of client capabilities in McKinsey’s New York office; Krzysztof Kwiatkowski, a capabilities and insights specialist, and Vivien Singer, a capabilities and insights expert, both at the Waltham Client Capability Hub; and Sven Smit, a senior partner in the Amsterdam office.

The authors wish to thank Richard Bucci, Samuel Cudre, Debadrita Dhara, Pragun Harjai, Tomasz Mataczynski, Moira Pierce, Jose Maria Quiros, Erik Rong, Maricruz Vargas, and Yifei Liu for their contributions to this article.

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McK: Why business building is the new priority for growth

Business building is the top priority for organic growth at companies during the COVID-19 pandemic, and incumbents are launching new businesses with ever greater frequency, according to our new global survey. 1 The findings suggest that companies that prioritize business building tend to grow faster than their peers, respond with greater resilience to volatility and economic shocks, and, as they gain experience building businesses, see more success from it. But not all companies succeed: only 24 percent of new businesses launched in the past ten years are viable large-scale enterprises today.

To shed light on the differences between outperformers and also-rans, our survey included more than 800 company executives across a range of industries, sectors, and geographies. So far as we know, this was the first at-scale research to explore corporate business building. The survey revealed that an impressive 52 percent of executives consider business building a top-three (or higher) priority for growth. We also found that a small set of companies enjoy success rates two times higher than those of high-potential start-ups (24 percent versus 8, respectively). 2 The experience of these companies clarifies the winning approach to launching and scaling new businesses. As more companies adopt these successful practices, a new wave of innovation could arise from not just entrepreneurial efforts but also intrapreneurial ones. That would boost organic growth and improve the prospects of companies looking to jump into the top tier of performance.

The new priority for organic growth.

Even before the pandemic, our own experience indicated that business building had become more important for incumbent companies looking to use innovative business models, products, and services to meet the threats and opportunities of a digitizing world. The COVID-19 crisis has accelerated and intensified that trend. In many industries, the pandemic has rewritten rules and upended assumptions, all while diminishing—or threatening to diminish—existing revenue streams. Replacing lost revenues, of course, requires finding new forms of growth. And while M&A remains an essential part of the growth playbook, P/E multiples remain high, and acquisitions can be expensive. Moreover, organic growth often creates greater excess returns to shareholders than dealmaking does, even during more normal times.

We studied four different approaches to organic growth and found that business building was the most effective among them. 3 Some 74 percent of companies that chose business building as their main strategy grew at rates above the average of their industries. Only 58 percent of the companies that prioritized different strategies did. No wonder so many executives ranked business building as a top-three priority for 2020 (Exhibit 1). And these companies are putting their money where their priorities are, allocating, on average, one-third of their organic-growth capital to business building—more than twice as much as the laggards do. The shift to business building isn’t confined to a few sectors or regions. In all those we surveyed, companies give business building pride of place on the corporate agenda (Exhibits 2 and 3).

More: https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/

About the authors: Shaun Collins is a consultant in McKinsey’s Boston office, where Upasana Unni is an associate partner; Ralf Dreischmeier is a senior partner in the London office; and Ari Libarikian is a senior partner in the New York office. The authors wish to thank Paige Frank and Anton Kärrman for their contributions to this article.